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Thread: Does this Brasilian Jujutsu REALLY work? :P

  1. #1
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    Does this Brasilian Jujutsu REALLY work? :P

    I was thiking nd awas talking to a firned and we were discussing that it is conclusively impossinble to utilise jujutsu or any ground fighting in a reak fight. I know this is an old argunment but i am sorry to say if i am lying on my back tryign to do a grapple on somebody and there is 2,3 4 or more of them how does this work?




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  2. #2
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    Yes, BJJ actually works. It gives you the knowledge of how to move on the ground, how to attain and hold a favorable position, and how to choke someone unconscious or disable their limbs with holds.

    For self defense, I would consider it a necessary but tertiary system to train in. I would not generally recommend that it be used offensively, but rather to escape bad positions. For example, if you end up on the ground, either by being thrown, being knocked down, or simply by slipping, and your opponent continues to pursue the fight, BJJ is fantastic to getting to a position of safety (the guard) and then reversing an opponent (with guard sweeps).

    Here is an example of escaping a hold-down into the guard-
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrfaGLTyAoU&feature=fvst

    And here are several examples of reversing from the bottom to a top position-
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dXBqH4vQu80

    I had a friend who was jumped by three guys and pushed to the ground. One of them stood over him and attempted hit punch him. He used a combination of MMA-specific ground-and-pound defense and BJJ guard work to smother the punches and get back to his feet from his back, where he was able to scare off his attackers. I would consider this using BJJ for self defense in its optimum form. It's not about lying on your back looking for a "grapple" (or more properly, a submission), though against an untrained opponent one can easily snag a choke or arm lock and finish them off before other people become a factor. However, strategically, I'd rather use it to escape to a standing position. Self defense is, first and foremost, about creating opportunities to remove oneself from danger.

    I'd say the most important thing BJJ gives you is that, like Judo, Sambo, Western wrestling, and other systems that spend time grappling on the ground, it gives you a certain comfort level with the close quarters of ground grappling and teaches you how to move on the ground. Newbies on the ground tend to panic and flail around in ways that only expose them to things like chokes and punching opportunities. In the gym, this is only embarassing; on the street it could be a fatal mistake.

    So yes, it "works". BJJ is based on mechanics and leverage. The techniques don't suddenly become useless if the environment changes. Whether prolonged ground grappling is a wise strategy is another matter, however.

  3. #3
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    The strength of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is the full force sparing (live sparring or rolling) it allows you to really test yourself against full force attacks and the simplified and effective techniques. You'll find many similar techniques in BJJ as in Judo, Aikido, Karate, Hapkido, etc. Some BJJ schools focus more on match/ring training and others more on self defense since learning out to fight in a ring is not always applicable to learning how to fight on the street. For example, many traditional martial arts always assume that your attacker has a concealed weapon (knife for example) so they feel its unwise to clinch or get too close and the need for mai-ai to keep from getting a knife in the stomach.

    Asking if one martial art "works" or is better than another is not really a valid question because all the Japanese arts share many if not most of the same tehniques since they all originated with family create Japanese jujutsu martial arts. The question is, are you well trained enough to defend yourself, or better yet, just smart enough not to get in a fight in the first place.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jujutsu

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